All Things Shoes

IMG_20150715_083831444It is always disappointing when a beloved pair of shoes is rendered unwearable. Running shoes can be dropped off with Nike’s Reuse-A-Shoe program, where they are ground up for use as tracks, fields, and playgrounds. Non-athletic shoes, compromised of much more varied materials, are essentially non-recyclable. Luckily, many shoe issues are solvable, and these tips may keep your shoes out of the trash can for a little longer.

1. Stinkiness. My blue flats recently started exuding an unpleasant odor after I went to Vegas. Don’t judge me, it was literally over 100 degrees every single day! I’m a human being, just like you! No big deal. I  put them in a plastic bag, shoved them into my freezer overnight, and Voila! no more stink.

Stuffing newspaper in them for a few days or spraying them with rubbing alcohol reportedly works as well.

2. Surface Wear. If your shoes are a very ordinary color (black or brown), you can generally pick up a tin of shoe polish for around four bucks, though fancier options are available. Aren’t they always!

3. Wear on Soles/Heels. I often extol the value of tailors and cobblers (I know the word has a Grimm Fairy Tale vibe, but that doesn’t take away from its accuracy), and I will continue to do so here. The tips of the heels on women’s shoes are a bargain to replace. I got them done for around $10 on a vintage pair I purchased. The cost of other work varies widely, but if you feel it’s not worth it to spend $20 to repair your shoes, I think you should consider buying better shoes. Quality is always cheaper in the long run.

All shoes wear out over time, but there are many steps you can take to minimize shoes damage before it happens, including keeping them out of hot and dry places, making smart choices of materials for repairs, and having thin rubber soles put on your shoes as soon as you get them.

Side note: when I was a ‘brownie‘ in the 1970s, the third grade launching pad to Girl Scouts, the brownie handbook contained a variation of the Elves and the Shoemaker from Grimm’s Fairy Tales. The overall message was that brownies should be like the elves, quietly doing the work of the shoemaker at night and never taking any credit for it. That incredibly sexist message never sat well with me, even as a third-grader, and it annoys me to this day. I never held it against shoemakers, though, who I have boundless affection for.

It does explain why I never went out to join the Girl Scouts.

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